Margaret Whitley

Margaret ?Meg? Whitley has been an elevator operator, newspaper carrier, postal worker, preschool/first grade teacher, and full-time mother. She holds a Master’s Degree and has done post-graduate work in gifted education. She is currently a teacher of gifted children but also loves writing, weaving on a handloom, and star-gazing. Ms. Whitley has three children, two wonderful grandchildren, and lives in the desert southwest.

Titles Available from Margaret Whitley



Writing short stories is not easy. The reason it isn't easy is because they are short. The writer is still charged with producing living characters who have personalities: good, bad, or milksop. Add to that a dynamic narrative that gives you, the reader, an opportunity to see, hear, feel, smell, and taste what the folks who inhabit those little stories do, and the authors have a demanding job on their hands. Short stories are a great deal more than sitting on an old apple crate and hammering away at the QWERTY.    
Does time exist as a separate dimension? Does it have a unique place with definable limits in space? Does it move independently according to its own purpose? Or does it only move when other things move, completely dependent on prevailing conditions and binding dimensions in its surrounding space-a causal result bound to the whole? Perhaps it’s just a simpleminded construct humans have concocted to explain the inexplicable. Is it vaguely possible that it’s a set of branes slightly out of sync and we may pass from one to the next at will? Maybe it’s a simple kink in dimensions that can be crossed by anyone walking in precisely the right direction. It could be that it’s just a mental state altered simply by a minor amount of imagination applied correctly. Perhaps it is no more than a drug- or mantra-induced change of mental state-something hallucinated-something seen but unseeable. Or is there more to it than we can fathom? In the world of physics, all of this-and much more-is being looked into by serious, conservative scientists as well as those with their mental equipment more loosely adjusted-or even unfastened completely, their brains rolling about like marbles in an empty railroad freight car.
TWISTED TAILS IV: Fantastic Flights of Fantasy is overflowing with some of the strangest fantasies you’re likely to find on-or off this planet. So, watch yourself...there be dragons here. And vampires. And sorcerers bearing all sorts of mischief. Beasts, goblins and ghouls aplenty. And things that poke with sharpened sticks at the unprepared mind. They crouch in the recesses, ready to spring at the slightest provocation or opportunity. The sort of things that hide in deep shadows and lurk in the darkness of night...or cavort in the full light of day, trundle, creep, crawl and dance their way across the stage of your imagination. Some of the works presented here are fearsome, level five heart-stoppers and others are downright funny. All are twisted. Twisted in the manner that only our convoluted cogitators...our warped, wonderful word-workers can provide.
As we launch into this sixth book of the TWISTED TAILS anthology series, I am reminded of Michael Crichton’s debut novel, THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN. Why? Because his first and quite likely his best published novel gave us a look at the possible and horrendous result of the introduction into our happy little home of an unknown biological entity from out there somewhere. Before we go on, some clarification is needed here. Although he is best-known for revived dinosaurs, ANDROMEDA STRAIN was his first published book under his own name ([JOHN] MICHAEL CRICHTON). Published in 1969, Crichton was still in medical school and was in his early twenties. Amazing.
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